Honors Theses

Date of Award

Spring 5-9-2020

Document Type

Undergraduate Thesis

Department

Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management

First Advisor

Jeremy Loenneke

Second Advisor

Matthew Jessee

Third Advisor

Xin Ye

Relational Format

Dissertation/Thesis

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the impact of cuff width, pressure, and sex on the perceptual response to blood flow restriction through a series of six experiments. Methods: Experiment One (n=50), Experiment Two (n=105), and Experiment Three (n=105) took place in the upper body, and Experiment Four (n=100), Experiment Five (n=100), and Experiment Six (n=100) took place in the lower body. Perceptual discomfort was measured following each condition. Results: Results are expressed as mean (+ SD). In Experiment One, there were no differences in discomfort. In Experiment Two, the wide cuff resulted in more discomfort [43 (20) AU] compared to the narrow cuff [39 (20) AU]. In Experiment Three, the misapplied pressure resulted in more discomfort [44 (21) AU] compared to the correctly applied pressure [41 (20) AU]. In Experiment Four, the narrow cuff elicited greater discomfort [16 (14) AU] compared to the wide cuff [12 (11) AU]; but only in individuals with an estimated arterial occlusion pressure. In Experiment Five, males [Narrow= 59 (18) AU, Wide= 57 (19) AU] experienced greater discomfort compared to females [Narrow= 47 (18) AU, Wide= 50 (20) AU]; but only in those with an estimated arterial occlusion pressure. In Experiment Six, the discomfort from the misapplied pressure [74 (21) AU] exceeded that of the correctly applied pressure [52 (21) AU]. Conclusion: The width, pressure, and location of the cuff should all be considered when assessing perceptual responses to blood flow restricted exercise. There is no evidence that sex has a meaningful impact on discomfort.

Available for download on Wednesday, May 04, 2022

Share

COinS