Faculty and Student Publications

Authors

Víctor Quesada, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Sandra Freitas-Rodríguez, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Joshua Miller, Yale University
José G. Pérez-Silva, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Zi Feng Jiang, Institute for Genomics & Systems Biology, University of Chicago
Washington Tapia, Parque Nacional Galápagos
Olaya Santiago-Fernández, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Diana Campos-Iglesias, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Lukas F.K. Kuderna, CSIC-UPF - Instituto de Biologia Evolutiva (IBE)
Maud Quinzin, Yale University
Miguel G. Álvarez, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Dido Carrero, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Luciano B. Beheregaray, Flinders University
James P. Gibbs, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Ylenia Chiari, University of South Alabama
Scott Glaberman, University of South Alabama
Claudio Ciofi, Università degli Studi di Firenze
Miguel Araujo-Voces, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Pablo Mayoral, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Javier R. Arango, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Isaac Tamargo-Gómez, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
David Roiz-Valle, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
María Pascual-Torner, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Benjamin R. Evans, Yale University
Danielle L. Edwards, UC Merced
Ryan C. Garrick, University of Mississippi
Michael A. Russello, University of British Columbia Okanagan
Nikos Poulakakis, Panepistimio Kritis
Stephen J. Gaughran, Yale University
Danny O. Rueda, Parque Nacional Galápagos
Gabriel Bretones, Instituto Universitario de Oncologia del Principado de Asturias
Tomàs Marquès-Bonet, CSIC-UPF - Instituto de Biologia Evolutiva (IBE)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2019

Abstract

© 2018, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited. Giant tortoises are among the longest-lived vertebrate animals and, as such, provide an excellent model to study traits like longevity and age-related diseases. However, genomic and molecular evolutionary information on giant tortoises is scarce. Here, we describe a global analysis of the genomes of Lonesome George—the iconic last member of Chelonoidis abingdonii—and the Aldabra giant tortoise (Aldabrachelys gigantea). Comparison of these genomes with those of related species, using both unsupervised and supervised analyses, led us to detect lineage-specific variants affecting DNA repair genes, inflammatory mediators and genes related to cancer development. Our study also hints at specific evolutionary strategies linked to increased lifespan, and expands our understanding of the genomic determinants of ageing. These new genome sequences also provide important resources to help the efforts for restoration of giant tortoise populations.

Relational Format

journal article

DOI

10.1038/s41559-018-0733-x

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