Lecture Series

What Was Native American Literature? Tribalism, Regionalism, and Comparativism, in the Age of Globalization

Title

What Was Native American Literature? Tribalism, Regionalism, and Comparativism, in the Age of Globalization

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Description

Melanie Benson Taylor (Herring Pond Wampanoag) is a literary critic who specializes in U.S. Southern studies. She explored the intersections of Native, African American, white, and immigrant southern cultures in her first two books: Disturbing Calculations: The Economics of Identity in Postcolonial Southern Literature, 1912-2002 (2008) and Reconstructing the Native South: American Indian Literature and the Lost Cause (2012). She continues to examine the effects of economic anxiety on the construction of cultural identity and borders in two new books projects: Faulkner’s Doom interrogates the use of Indian tropes in William Faulkner’s modern South, and Indian Killers uncovers the phenomenon of violence and murder in texts by and about contemporary Native Americans. The inaugural Edith T. Baine Lecture Series on November 28 at 6:00 p.m. in the Depot is free and open to the public.

Publication Date

11-28-2012

Relational Format

presentation

Disciplines

American Literature | Indigenous Studies

What Was Native American Literature? Tribalism, Regionalism, and Comparativism, in the Age of Globalization

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