Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A. in Modern Languages

Department

Modern Languages

First Advisor

Donald Dyer

Second Advisor

Christopher Sapp

Third Advisor

Iepuri Valentina

Relational Format

dissertation/thesis

Abstract

The current study investigates a relationship between the ease of perception of a feature of secondary palatalization in Russian and a speech condition (casual and hyperarticulated). Forty-one L1 American English speakers – the students of the Russian program at The University of Mississippi – took part in two experiments. In addition, the research aimed to explore the influence of a hyperarticulated speech condition on a level of language proficiency of students (beginner or intermediate) and investigate whether students of a certain level benefit from hyperarticulation more. The results of two experiments showed that none of the groups of students benefited from hyperarticulation while perceiving a palatalized/unpalatalized consonant contrast. Moreover, the research provided the proof that hyperarticulation has no significant effect on perception of secondary palatalization in the Russian language.

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