Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.S. in Pharmaceutical Science

Department

Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery

First Advisor

Soumyajit Majumdar

Second Advisor

Eman Ashour

Third Advisor

Michael Repka

Relational Format

dissertation/thesis

Abstract

Natamycin (NT), also known as Pimaricin, is predominantly used as an anti-fungal medication for the treatment of fungal infections around the eye. The goal of the present study was to formulate and optimize NT loaded nanoemulsion (NT-NE) and examine its potential application in ophthalmic drug delivery. Placebos were evaluated with respect to particle size, PDI and ZP to identify the aqueous phase and lipid phase concentrations to be carried forward with NT-NE development. NT-NE were prepared by hot homogenization and ultra-probe sonication method, using Castor oil (CO) and Miglyol 812 as liquid lipids, Tween®80 and Poloxomer 188 as surfactants. NT-NE were characterized for physicochemical properties such as particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential (ZP) and assay. The in-vitro release studies were planned using 10kDa Slide-A-Lyzer™ Dialysis cassettes and compared with the NT suspension used as control (NT-C). Physical stability of NT-NE was measured at room temperature and refrigerated storage conditions. Particle size, PDI, ZP of NT-NE were in the range of 150-350 nm, 0.1-0.45 and -32.0 to -64.73 mV, respectively. The assay of the NT-NE formulations was in the range of 95-101%. From the release studies, sustained and dose-dependent release of the NT was observed from NE compared with NT-C. The approximate %drug release from the castor oil based NT-NE (C1) was 15% and 5% from Miglyol 812 NT-NE (M3) in a 24 hour period. The results, therefore, suggest that the NT-NE system can be a favorable drug delivery platform for the treatment of oculat fungal infections.

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